Have you read this?

Mentions of Hatley we've spotted


South Cambs magazine, winter 2019 – panel on great places featuring a photo of St Denis' church, East Hatley, Cambridgeshire.

Depending on where you live, there can be any number of mentions of your locality in books on the countryside, buildings, counties, cities, towns and villages.

Arthur Mee's Cambridgeshire, first published in 1939 and reprinted in 1949. It includes a snapshot of East Hatley and Hatley St George.

Arthur Mee’s Cambridgeshire, published in 1939, includes a snapshot of East Hatley and Hatley St George.

Even Hatley gets a mention here and there, not too often, it’s true, but we do crop up occasionally.

So, we thought we’d document those mentions on this website – if you go to Hatley in books, you’ll see how far we’ve got.

Have you any books which give a mention to East Hatley and / or Hatley St George?  If so, please let Peter Mann know so he can include your book – peter@buzzassociates.co.uk / 65 11 15.


And have you seen…

South Cambs magazine, winter 2019 – panel on great places featuring a photo of St Denis' church, East Hatley, Cambridgeshire.

South Cambs Magazine, winter 2019, has a panel on ‘Great places’ featuring a photo of St Denis’ church.

In the latest (winter) edition of South Cambs Magazine the photo of St Denis’ church in East Hatley? 

It’s been used to illustrate part of an article on the consultation for the next Local Pan, a joint Plan between South Cambs District Council and Cambridge City Council which will follow the current Local Plan after it finishes in 2031.

If you’re wondering why work on a plan for the 2030s now, well, it’s partly the way local councils work and partly because the current Plan spent four years on the desk of the Inspector, consequently delaying its introduction by a couple of years.

Anyway, under the photo of St Denis’ (supplied by us!), and the heading ‘Great places’, it says:

Cambridge and the surrounding area is known for its heritage – how should we protect it and make sure that communities get the most out of our historic buildings and landscapes?

Turn to page six of the magazine to find out more about the consultation (which begins on 13th January) and page eight for the St Denis’ photo.

As we document in our piece on Just how was St Denis’ saved?, it was thanks to SCDC commissioning a report, in 2003, on the state of the then very sad looking building which eventually led to its initial repair as a sound and safe structure – before SCDC (as owners of the building) gave it to the Friends of Friendless Churches to become its guardian in 2016.

FoFC has subsequently spent a considerable sum on putting in a new floor and windows in the nave, and is looking to complete repairs to the interior of the church so it can be kept open all the time: an 800 year old building redundant but not abandoned.

Post created 29th November 2019.and updated 2nd December 2019.